CICERONE’S LANCASHIRE – A REGULAR RIBBLE RAMBLE.

A walk I must have done dozens of times. I was looking for a short flattish walk to test out my knee. Walk 22 in the Cicerone guidebook fitted the bill, and I was anticipating the woods full of bluebells. It turned out to be a day of bright sunshine but with a violent wind out of the east.

The Shireburn Arms in Hurst Green was busy with the sunny weekend weather. I didn’t use their car park but found a spot in the village near the war memorial. Lambing Clough Lane took me down past the C17th Trough House (they have a fetish for weighing scales) to the new Dinckley bridge over the River Ribble. The river was running low with the exposed pebbly beaches accessible.

This stretch seemed to be popular with dog walkers today – but doesn’t everyone own a dog or two now. Entering Marles Wood the path threads between the trees often awkwardly over the exposed roots. The bluebells were only just starting, but there was a good display of  Wood Anemones and the Lesser Celandines were hanging on. The new beech leaves were the greenest of greens.

At Sales Wheel the river was completely placid, compare with conditions when running high – SALES WHEEL – THE RIBBLE POST-FLOOD.

One of the problems with this circuit is the kilometre of road walking from Salesbury Hall to Ribchester bridge. The road however was quiet and my attention was directed to the wayside plants. The blooms of the Blackthorn are fading to be replaced by the emerging Hawthorn. Yellow Dandelions and white Dead Nettles covered the verges. Soon I was crossing the elegant bridge which has seen some recent damage from vehicles.

Onwards past the farm and into the riverside woods where flood debris is always piled up, but thankfully someone has been collecting the plastics. Unfortunately the right of way leaves the river, what a shame – if only access could have been obtained all the way back to Dinckley Bridge. I have in the past persisted in trespassing alongside the river but remember it being difficult. On this day in 1932, hundreds of folk marched on the famous Kinder Scout protest, and we are approaching a time when we may need to resist the Tory’s crackdown on our access to land.

I’ve always found navigating the fields here a bit of a challenge and Mark’s  directions didn’t really help. The bluebells in the woods at Starling Brook compensated for my previous disappointment. Wild garlic was also showing well, I must pick some for a delicious meal with poached egg.

There are good views of Pendle and the Ribble Valley from these hills. With luck, I arrived at the bridge over Dean Brook, the stream I followed to find Raven Lumb Falls last April.

A steep climb led back to Lambing Clough Lane and into Hurst Green.

As an aside on the way home I spotted another of those evocative slate poems next to St. John’s Church.  Poignant thoughts.

Anyone wanting to follow this walk could shorten it by parking at Marles Wood and avoid the loop into Hurst Green.

*****

10 thoughts on “CICERONE’S LANCASHIRE – A REGULAR RIBBLE RAMBLE.

  1. conradwalks.blogspot.com

    So, how did your afflictions hold up? No summary about that so I hope that is because there was nothing more adverse to report on?

    I have found a new failsafe method for poached eggs.

    You need a bowl about 4 ins. diameter.
    Put in half a cup of water.
    Break egg gently into water.
    Microwave for maximum of 80secs.

    That produces yolk going onto overcooked side. I think 70 secs is about spot on but the differences are for one’s personal preference.

    Reply
    1. bowlandclimber Post author

      I will try that recipe. Going for some wild garlic today as I didn’t have a plastic bag on Sunday – they don’t half stink your rucksack otherwise.
      The least said about my knee the better.

      Reply
  2. Michael Graeme

    As you may recall I did struggle finding my way on the north bank section – partly my incompetence. And it is a pity the path swings away from the river, but you’ve inspired me to have another go. The woodlands look spectacular.

    Reply

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