SCOUT SCAR – limestone highway.

Wainwright’s  Outlying Fells  –  Cunswick Scar and Scout Scar.

Scout Scar.

Scout Scar.

I mused about starting to complete Wainwright’s Outlying Fells a couple of weeks ago and it hasn’t stopped raining since. The Lake District has had some dreadful flooding and it’s been best to avoid travelling there. This weekend there was heavy rain again on the Saturday but the forecast for Sunday was for frost and a clear morning. Hence we found ourselves parked up in Kendal adjacent to Serpentine Woods, the higher western side of town which has some pleasant housing. We simply followed the master’s guide from then on [Chapter 1]. An old tramway took us past its limestone quarry into the fells, or more correctly into a golf course. Tracks led everywhere but we just followed the crowds. A large proportion of Kendal’s population seemed to be heading for the heights,  is that normal for a Sunday or are they all going up to survey the surrounding floods?  They were the usual dog walkers and casual walkers but also a fair proportion of runners enjoying the firm dry tracks, the whole area is Limestone. Everyone gave a friendly greeting. Before we knew it we were atop Cunswick Scar on the edge of the escarpment with views all round of snowy Lakeland peaks.

Kendal below.

Kendal below.

Approaching Cunswick Scar.

Approaching Cunswick Scar.

A path followed the edge southwards towards a communication tower and crossing a road we were on the continuation ridge to Scout Scar. The prominent summit structure is called ‘the mushroom’ or ‘the umbrella’, it is in fact a shelter with a built in viewfinders. It was built in 1912 commemorating the coronation of George V and has had several refurbishments. A perfect spot for refreshments and viewing, the Howgills looked close and splendid in their winter coat, as did the Langdale Pikes. The continuation along the edge gave us views over the Lyth Valley sadly still under water. In the past I have climbed on the cliffs below, memories of loose trad climbs and some poor sport climbs [bolted] but from up here you had no impression of the crag face. I did spot one lower off and a couple of bolts. The day had been freezing with watery sunshine but clouds were building from the south as we descended through junipers to the outskirts of town. It stared raining as we reached the car.

'The mushroom'

‘The mushroom’

Distant Langdale Pikes.

Distant Langdale Pikes.

 

 

Distant Morecambe Bat and the flooded Lyth Valley.

Distant Morecambe Bat and the flooded Lyth Valley.

A perfect little walk in these conditions, good under foot with wide ranging views.

 

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