Zillertal Rucksack Route. II

Kasseler Hütte – Greizer Hütte.

We knew we were in the big mountains when only after 3 hours did we start climbing the 800m to today’s pass, [2701m]  Lapen Scharte The day had started bright and clear, perfect for the long traverse below the glacier of Grosser Loeffler. We hopped across glacial streams with the odd bridge of help. Soon after leaving the hut we passed through the incongruous door, an ‘art’ installation on the hillside which hopefully will eventually disintegrate. The Kasseler remained in view all morning across the valley. Towards the end of the traverse cables helped us across a cliff face. On a magnificent viewpoint down the Stilluptal valley we snacked and girded our loins for the difficult climb through the boulder field up to the pass. Great care was needed not to loose the trail and not to break a leg amongst the haphazard rocks. The final steep pull up was rewarded by views to the steep gully leading to Moerchen Scharte, tomorrow’s unlikely objective.  An Ibex sat and watched us from a perch above the path. I managed to gash my leg badly  on a granite boulder at the pass reminding me to be more careful, I’m not as agile as I used to be. The Matterhorn like Greizer Spitze loomed above. Thankfully the way down the otherside was much easier and we soon sipping Berghütte trinken on the sunny balcony of the Greizer Hütte. Supper with some Dutch lads was enjoyable but we were soon ready for bed, 9pm.  We were assigned a busy dormitory but thankfully nobody snored.

The long traverse towards the pass in early morning light.

The long traverse towards the pass in early morning light.

Glacial streams.

Glacial streams.

The infamous door.

The infamous door.

Slow progress.

Slow progress.

Looking across to the Kasseler Hutte.

Looking across to the Kasseler Hutte.

Up to the pass.

Up to the pass.

Onwards and upwards.

Onwards and upwards.

Spot the Ibex.

Spot the Ibex.

The commanding Greizer Spitze.

The commanding Greizer Spitze.

Down to the Greizer.

Down to the Greizer Hütte.

Greizer Hutte.

Greizer Hutte.

Tomorrow's gully looks daunting.

Tomorrow’s gully looks daunting.

Today’s quote – “it’s not nice gneiss”  as we crossed the difficult boulder field.

4 thoughts on “Zillertal Rucksack Route. II

  1. McFadzean

    Art installations in remote mountain places are becoming more common. The most impressive one I’ve seen so far is the huge rock sculpture at the source of the South Tyne, way up the valley from Garrigill. Not sure if they are a good or a bad idea. Are Bronze Age cairns and rock sculptures a similar thing? I don’t suppose the ancients had EU or Art Council funding to help them along.
    Nice scenery, by the way. Sounds like hard going.
    Cheers, Alen

    Reply
    1. bowlandclimber Post author

      Yes, there are a few ‘sculpture trails’ around Lancashire which give interesting walking and some good artistic interpretations which have relevance to the land. Notably Andy Goldsworthy’s installations on Clougha Pike – https://wordpress.com/post/bowlandclimber.wordpress.com/3195
      I don’t know the one on the Tyne.
      The ‘door’ was supposed to give one enlightenment on passing through to the mountain, didn’t do much for us.
      It is hard going, now you know why we need the dumplings.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s