NEWTON AND SLAIDBURN.

                                                     The Hodder between Newton nad Slaidburn.

A short walk was all I needed today.

I’m always driving through these two villages so I thought it was time to visit in more detail. During this Covid pandemic everyone seems to be out and about. All the car-parks are overflowing and the honey spots overwhelmed, I’ve usually kept well clear but today I had to park up in Newton. Mea culpa.  I found a safe spot outside of the village but noticed some thoughtless blocking of farmers’ gates etc.

I first wandered around the olde worlde hamlet of Newton – in – Bowland..

Georgian Newton Hall.

Salisbury Hall.

John Brabbins Old School. 1757.

Old school 1842.

Old reading room. Late C18th.

United Reformed Church. 1887.

 

Then I was ready to start the riverside walk to Slaidburn. The River Hodder.

Ahead was the limestone bluff above Dunhow Hall.

There are cliff faces up there in the trees and I had time to climb up and explore. On closer acquaintance the rock was overhanging and compact, not much scope for my style of climbing, i.e.  too hard.Whilst I was up here I explored further and came out into meadows on top of the hill with good views towards Slaidburn. I wandered down to re-join the path near the gatehouse and then walked into Slaidburn on a short stretch of busy road. I sought sanctuary at the 15th century St. Andrew’s Church which turned out to be open. I’ve never visited it but read of rich internal features. Most of the interior was taped off so I only had a glimpse of the elaborate screen, Norman font, box pews and pulpit. Outside there was a sundial from 1796 and a shaft of a Medieval Cross.

Next door was the Old Grammar School founded in 1717 and still in use as a village school.

Rows of 16/17 C cottages lead into the village and there in front of you is The Hark to Bounty pub.

The inn’s name is from the sound of the C19th Squire’s dog, Bounty.

At the top of the steps was the old courtroom of the district.

The war memorial is on an island and an old Wesleyan Chapel has been restored.

Chapel Street.

The café on the village green was doing a roaring trade from passing travellers. Some impressive motor bikes were on display.

Leaving the hubbub I climbed away from the bridge and crossed into fields heading over into the Easington valley I’d been in a few days ago. The weather conditions today were much pleasanter with clear views of Easington Fell .

At Broadhead Farm I chatted to the farmer as he selected lambs to go to auction.

Following Easington Brook…… I came to the impressive Easington Manor House once again.Easington hamlet was as quiet as normal. Onwards through fields by Easington Brook to join the Hodder and a path back to the elegant Newton Bridge. And that was just a short walk.

*****

7 thoughts on “NEWTON AND SLAIDBURN.

  1. conradwalks.blogspot.com

    Another gem of an area – not surprised it has been so heavily invaded. “Hark to Bounty” would be what the huntsman would be shouting at his pack of hounds when he thought Bounty had found the proper scent, i.e. “hark” in the sense of pay attention to. I’m sure you would know that but it may not be that obvious to others.

    Reply
    1. bowlandclimber Post author

      Yes. This is what the owners say –
      Most of the existing fabric of the building dates from the 16th century. The inn was known as The Dog until 1875, when the squire of the village, who was also the Rector, had a pack of hounds. One day whilst out hunting, he and his party called at the inn for refreshments. Their drinking was disturbed by a loud and prolonged baying from the pack outside. High above the noise of the other hounds could be heard the squire’s favourite dog, which prompted him to call out ….

      “Hark to Bounty!”

      Reply
    1. bowlandclimber Post author

      If those two villages were in the Cotswolds they would be famous. Almost half the properties are grade II listed.
      As it is they are attracting far more tourists than ever. On my walk I hardly met anyone once into the fields, so I can’t complain.

      Reply
  2. Eunice

    I’ve been to Slaidburn – my partner and I got an old Billy Goat from a farm there about twelve years ago – but not to Newton. It looks a nice little place so I must make an effort to go there sometime 🙂

    Reply

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